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Album Review from GIGsoup!

Screen shot 2015-09-20 at 11.23.56 AMDaphne Lee Martin ‘Fall On Your Sword’ 

Martin flirts with multiple genres from smooth jazz, to rap, folk to Spanish flamenco. The experimental air about this album gives it a unique edge, containing raw imagination, the kind the music industry hasn’t seen for while. Multiple tracks include fragments of public speeches, each carefully utilised to convey a very specific message.

Martin embarks on a journey to create an album that is both timeless and aware of current trends. Her deep, soulful, smooth vocals are dripping with passion and spirit, blending perfectly in the balance of each track.

With this album, Martin is showing the world her vast capabilities and vivid imagination. An expression of real gumption and resourcefulness, it intertwines a multitude of genres together without making it feel disjointed or out of place. Even the Crazy Frog makes an appearance! She is definitely someone paving the way for new directions with this unique collection of tracks. An album that should certainly satisfy those craving some clever song writing and interesting arrangements.

Frost review from the Valley Advocate

Jet Engines, by Amy McCarley, and Frost, by Daphne Lee Martin

This weekend, Amy McCarley and Daphne Lee Martin perform at Luthier’s Co-op in Easthampton in support of their new albums, Jet Engines and Frost, respectively.

“Everybody Wants To,” the first track from Alabama alt-country artist McCarley’s Jet Engines, begins with a philosophical inquiry into the nature of individuality and universality. She states that there are certain desires shared by everyone, then sings in her low alto: “Well I’m not everybody/ I’m just me/ But I am one body/ and anyone can see/ Everybody needs to believe in something/ And everybody is no different from me.”

McCarley plays acoustic guitar on all 10 of the album’s tracks. Her harmonica work lends an especially relaxed mood throughout, as does the guitar playing of George Bradfute, who sits in with his electric on “Smart Man,” and his slide on “Head Out of Town.”

After listening to McCarley, Martin’s indie offering Frost sounds especially synthesized—not in a bad way—with William James Readey using his keyboards to do an impressive impression of a samchillian tip tip tip cheeepeeeee. (The space age-sounding samchillian is a keyboard MIDI controller designed by Leon Guenbaum, who plays it so effectively in guitarist Vernon Reid’s band Masque.)

Frost begins with “Little Birds,” which is full of samchillian-esque sounds, before segueing into “The Book of Love,” the album’s only cover. The Magnetic Fields tune has also been covered by Peter Gabriel. The middle three tracks—”Make It Rain,” “More Flies With Honey,” and “Smile at Perfect Strangers”—show Martin’s jazzy blues side. “Five Points,” the eighth and final song, is an upbeat, electronica instrumental.

Ohio native and schooner veteran Martin sings and plays electric and acoustic guitar, banjo, flute, and other “sounds,” the album’s inside cover notes. Beneath the CD hold there is a stenciled quote: “Treat a queen like a whore and a whore like a queen,” which Mickey Doyle offered in Boardwalk Empire, just as Frank had in Alien 3.

(Originally appeared in the Valley Advocate.)